An overview of the practice of female genital mutilation

The seal is formed by cutting and repositioning the inner or outer labia, with or without removal of the clitoris. Consequences of FGM Many men and women from practising communities can be unaware of the relationship between FGM and its harmful physical and mental health consequences. The short-term consequences following FGM can include: The longer-term implications for women who have had FGM types 1 and 2 are likely to be related to the trauma of the actual procedure, while health problems caused by FGM type 3 are more severe and long-lasting.

An overview of the practice of female genital mutilation

Estimates that "as many as 30 million girls are at risk of being cut over the next decade if current trends continue. In countries like Egypt, Kenya and Sudan it is being performed by medical providers.

One convincing piece of evidence that the practice is found among other religions is found by comparing data from two countries. Among girls and women: In Mauritania and Egypt, most boys and men also regard it to be a religious requirement. Several regional and national fatwas have followed in the years since.

Their text was based on the original statement.

Procedures

The main denominations and traditions of the principal religions in Africa and the Middle East generally tend to have very fixed and restrictive rules concerning women's behavior. They also tend to have a major concern about sexual activity, particularly pre-marital sex and adultery.

FGM banned throughout Nigeria: Of all the countries in Africa, Nigeria has the largest population: They are particularly critical for organisations working tirelessly to end FGM. In Nigeria, this law provides them with a legal framework and backing to tackle the problem.

The legislation sends a clear message on impunity and serves as a basis for holding government to account. However, criminalisation of entrenched cultural practices has its limitations. While legal safeguards are an important step towards ending FGM, they are not enough to eliminate it.

An overview of the practice of female genital mutilation

Ending violence against women and girls requires investment, not just laws written in statute books. This is why we must emphasise community engagement, with a view towards shifting social norms, as a critical component of the eradication of FGM.

It is crucial that we scale up efforts to change traditional cultural views that underpin violence against women. Only then will this harmful practice be eliminated. Doing so involves laws and policies, as well as community level engagement and programmes that work to empower girls directly. Education is crucial, and must work in conjunction with school systems.

It is also important to promote reporting of the practice, ensure perpetrators are prosecuted and address stigma.Report overview The traditional practice of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) has proven remarkably persistent, despite nearly a century of attempts to eliminate it.

Yet the growing num­. Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. The practice is mostly carried out by traditional circumcisers, who often play other central roles in communities, such as attending childbirths.

An overview of the practice of female genital mutilation

Female genital mutilation, sometimes also called female sexual mutilation, comprises “all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia, or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons” (WHO, ).

"Female genital mutilation comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for . 'Female genital mutilation (FGM) comprises all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.' 1 It involves removing and damaging healthy female genital tissue, and hence interferes with the natural function of girls' and women's bodies.

FGM/C is now the preferred acronym used by UNICEF to refer to "Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting." They report that: 1 "FGM/C is concentrated in a swath of countries from the Atlantic Coast to the Horn of Africa, with wide variations in the percentage of girls and women cut, both within and across countries.

An Overview of Female Genital Mutilation in Nigeria